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20121007
20121015
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)
. in fact, like many of you come out my political and educational and historical education started with my family. my consciousness about being black and being proud began with the luminous woman in my life will comprise my roots, my fulcrum and my foundation. my fraternal grandmother, her father was born a slave and later became an owner of a farm in virginia. in prince edward county, virginia. this was the county that was the site of a 1951 protest led by black students to persuade their local school board to build them a better school. it also led in part to the landmark civil rights place -- decision, brown vs. board of education. my grandmother and her sisters realized early on that education was important for their survival. their unshakeable persistence and unflinching sacrifice led them to better lives. not only did they had -- have to do with racism but the belief that a woman's place was in the home and in this case on the farm doing the chores like cooking, cleaning, milking the cow and cutting wood. this is the 1930's. you have to cut wood for everything. as i mentioned earlier
and the rest of the elementary grades, but also focusing on the students that were not given adequate education that they deserved yesterday, then i can talk about that. >> so, you probably know what the numbers were looking like 10 years ago as i was. thank you, mr. chair. that's all i have. >> colleagues, i'd like to turn it over to public comment. i think it's really important for us to hear from members of the public. so, i have a number of speaker cards that i'm going to read. but any member of the public who would like to speak on items 1 and 2, i would ask that you come forward. so, the speaker cards are from sharon hewett, robert woods, lilly ratcliff, jamil patterson, peter alexander, and ace washington. please come up. you each have two minutes. and we also have shaman walton. >>> hi, i'm [speaker not understood], and i did not fill out a card. i do apologize. one thing we're talking about solutions. first i wanted you to picture this. my kids' friends, when i encourage them to go back to school after they graduate, say, hey, i'm not going to live beyond 21. what for? there's hopeless
the way in terms of prevention and education and research because we can beat this disease and i know we're going to. so, congratulations, everyone. (applause) >> i'm pleased to introduce from district 9 supervisor david campos. (applause) >> thank you very much. i'll be very brief, and this is definitely a great birthday present. you know, i've known scott weaner for many years. we went to law school together, and i think something he said about our youth today is something that is very, very important for us to remember. you know, as youth, you always have the concept of the invincibility of youth and we've all had that. you're a young person, you don't think that anything can happen to you. but the reality is that for folks who are part of this newer generation, they didn't go through that. and i think it's important for us to underscore the severity of this disease, of this illness, and it's still des mating many communities. and it is especially low-income communities, communities of color, you have gay african-american men, latino men infected on a daily basis. people forget we sti
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)